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What your $48M bought for parks and open space

THE SALT LAKE TRIBUNE – In the hills high above Herriman, you preserved hundreds of acres of rugged Oquirrh Mountain wilderness teeming with wild turkeys and a herd of elk. You plunked your tax dollars into a Taylorsville bass pond, carved out land for a regional park in Draper, unlocked segments of the Bonneville Shoreline Trail and protected an Emigration Canyon highland swimming with cutthroat trout.

Yes, you did it. You paid about $6.50 a year (if you own a $200,000 home) to guard that green space as part of a $48 million parks and open-space bond. Now that the money is nearly depleted, let’s take a look at how Salt Lake County leaders spent it.

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Step up — and see S.L. treasures

THE DESERET NEWS – From Gravity Hill to Hobbitville, there aren’t many of Salt Lake City’s “secrets” that Carolee Stout hasn’t explored.

As a longtime tour guide with a penchant for the peculiar, she likes nothing better than showing people the treasures hiding just beyond their doorsteps.

Now, with the economy tanking along with our spring vacation dreams, she says, what better time to play tourist for a day or two in our own town?

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Input sought on Gallivan redesign

THE DESERET NEWS – An effort to revamp the Gallivan Center will take center stage this week.

Looking for public input on the multimillion-dollar redesign, architects and Salt Lake City planners will host a workshop on the downtown plaza’s stage Monday night.

“The people love Gallivan,” said City Councilman Eric Jergensen. “We want to make the best possible public space that we can.”

The center is located at 50 E. 200 South, and the workshop begins at 6 p.m.

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West-siders want concrete around their TRAX line

THE SALT LAKE TRIBUNE – West-siders this week pleaded with the Salt Lake City Council to embed the planned North Temple TRAX line in concrete instead of rocks. Nearly all of those who addressed the council at a public hearing Tuesday night said train tracks planted in smooth concrete would spruce up the street and invite a good vibe for redevelopment along what city leaders say they would like to refashion into a “Grand Boulevard.”

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Consultant gives Provo council ideas on revitalizing downtown

DESERET NEWS – PROVO — The future of downtown Provo could look decidedly different than it does today if the City Council takes the advice of Santa Clara, Calif., retail real estate consultant Randol Mackley.

The mix of retail to attract more shoppers should start with additional restaurants, then spin off into other businesses such as men’s and women’s clothing stores, bookstores and other eclectic shops, Mackley said Tuesday during a presentation on revitalizing downtown.

Provo resident Melanie McCoard said revitalizing downtown is long overdue.

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Feds push for more ‘green’ in rural areas

DESERET NEWS – Growing “green” could be the way to put more “green” on your bottom line. That was the message at a workshop Tuesday hosted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Rural Development Agency focusing on the agency’s Rural Energy for America Program, or REAP.

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Salt Lake City leaders seek public input on Gallivan redesign

DESERET NEWS – An effort to revamp the Gallivan Center will take center stage next week.

Looking for public input on the multimillion-dollar redesign,architects and Salt Lake City planners will host a workshop on the downtown plaza’s stage Monday night.

“The people love Gallivan,” said City Councilman Eric Jergensen. “We want to make the best possible public space that we can.”

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Expert says downtown Provo on the right track

DAILY HERALD – PROVO — A national expert in retail growth says Provo has laid the groundwork for a downtown business boom, but the city must play its cards right if it wants Center Street to stand up to local malls.

Randol Mackley, a principal with the California-based Retail Real Estate Group, told the city’s Municipal Council on Tuesday that downtown must create a unique, walkable atmosphere if it would compete with local malls, which have drawn much retail attention away from the area over the years. He said the tumultuous market often determines much of the outcome, but a little planning could go a long way toward fostering a thriving downtown.

“Downtown’s customer has changed,” said Mackley, a Provo native who has helped develop retail blueprints for several California cities. “Today’s downtown customer is choosing Los Hermanos over McDonalds. Also, they’re choosing the Covey Center over the cineplex movies.”

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THE SALT LAKE TRIBUNE – Expert: Downtown Provo can be saved, in time

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Money should fund students, not buildings

DAILY UTAH CHRONICLE – I’ve been a student at the U on and off since way back before the Marriott Library became a real gem of modern campus architecture, all glass and light and space. The new Grand Reading Room surely has one of the most beautiful views of any reading room anywhere. That building used to be more or less the exact opposite, dark and dreary and dank, even on the higher floors.

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Millcreek steps nearer limits on ‘monster homes’

THE DESERET NEWS – One more step on a long path to new zoning measures aimed at limiting “monster home” construction in Millcreek Township was completed last Monday night as the Millcreek Planning Commission heard public testimony on a proposal that will soon be headed for the Salt Lake County Council.

After first surfacing in February 2007, the decision of how to, or whether to, adjust zoning restrictions in the four east-side communities that comprise the Millcreek Township has polarized the approximately 62,000 who call the area home.

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